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Ferrari Energy Shares How to Celebrate Small Wins to Keep Employees Motivated

Keeping employees productive over time can be challenging. Celebrating small wins is one way to maintain productivity. In this article, Ferrari Energy explains why employee recognition is critical to sustained productivity and, ultimately, your company’s success.

Ferrari Energy Shares How to Celebrate Small Wins to Keep Employees Motivated

Study after study supports the idea that an employee recognition program can help employees feel satisfied with their job and remain vested in the success of their employer — but realizing the full benefits of this type of program can be complex.

After all, one person’s motivation may be another’s aggravation.

A highly motivated plant manager may think recognition for continuously showing up for work on time is a frivolous waste of time. Her work ethic may be such that she would never be late for work.

On the other hand, a young shipping clerk may see 90 days without being late for work a worthy goal to which he is willing to commit himself.

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Here are three proven ideas for how you can celebrate small wins in your organization to keep employees engaged long-term.

1. Make It a Team Sport

If your workforce is divided into logical teams — retail locations, shifts, or departments — try rewarding team achievements. Rewarding teamwork instead of individual performance has two primary benefits.

First, it helps your employees develop a strong teamwork ethic while building meaningful relationships between the team members. Second, teams can motivate individuals who do not want to let the rest of the team down.

2. Use Customer Comments

If your employees regularly come in contact with your customers, ask your customers for input. Using customer comment cards or surveys can prompt customers to tell you how your employees are doing.

Encourage positive customer comments since people are naturally motivated to express disappointment more than delight.

While you want to know when there’s a problem, the purpose of the customer’s input is to document exceptional employee performance, not air customer grievances.

3. Create Individualized Achievement Goals

Remember our plant manager that would never think of being late for work? Try creating an individualized achievement program for each employee, or if that’s not practical, each type of employee.

For example, the plant manager could be very motivated to stay productive long-term if she is acknowledged with company shares tied to profit thresholds.

Our brand-new shipping clerk, on the other hand, would love to be recognized for his smaller achievements as well.

Regardless of how you choose to acknowledge superior performance to keep employees engaged and motivated, try to make the rewards cumulative.

If your employees can accumulate a significant financial benefit from meeting incremental achievement goals over time, they are less likely to look for another job.

Bringing on a new employee is expensive. The average cost-per-hire is around $4,500, and it can take 40 days to fill an open position.

Consider using the anticipated cost savings from employee longevity to fund your employee recognition program. It takes an upfront investment, but the long-term results will be worth it.

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